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Re: [TowerTalk] TowerTalk Digest, Vol 58, Issue 88

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Subject: Re: [TowerTalk] TowerTalk Digest, Vol 58, Issue 88
Date: Thu, 25 Oct 2007 09:39:39 -0600
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>     I learned quite a few things about towers and climbing them here on 
> TowerTalk.  The one that comes to >my mind from Doug's advice on testing your 
> connection to the tower is this:  Look, Listen and Feel.

>1.   Look at where you're connecting.  Make sure you're hooking onto your D 
>ring and not to a tool on your climbing belt.  

>2.   Listen for the positive click of the snap hook closing onto the D ring.

>3.   Feel the snap hook to make sure it's actually closed.

>    Only then should you lean back and transfer your safety from your hands to 
> the positiong strap.  

>     BTW - Your snap hook should be connected to the D ring of your climbing 
> belt with its opening AWAY >from you.  You won't roll into the snap hook and 
> disengage it.  Of course, most serious positioning belts >these days have 
> double snap hooks that include a safety catch that prevents roll-outs.  The 
> second catch >must be depressed before the snap's main catch can be opened. 
> Tough to open accidentally. 

>     Caveat Amateur.

>73 de
>Gene Smar  AD3F


I could not agree more with you! I worked for a large Telecom and either saw or 
heard of tons errors (mostly from seasoned "knuckle draggers" that resulted in 
maiming or death One of my best friends snapped to a large screwdriver in his 
tool pouch and fell 24 feet. While he can walk (after having his spine fused), 
he will never be the same. Another had a "messenger" in his hand and contacted 
4.4 KW service. He lost both arms and has a huge scar in his chest (he was only 
24 years old at the time).

I would add to your statements:

1. Check your equipment before each climb. This means daily! 
2. Stretch your body thoroughly as if you were about to jog.
3. Check your surroundings.
4. Check the structure before and as you climb.
3. To continuing looking at the snap as you proceed through steps 2 and 3. 

Height never matters with respect to safety. You can die equally well from 25 
or 100 feet. Maimed persons relate horrible tales. Dead persons tell no tales.

Semper Fi,

Tommy - K6YE


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