[Hooper] More information re: the new Absalom Hooper DNA results

Clay Hooper clayhooper at sbcglobal.net
Sun Nov 26 22:38:06 EST 2006


More from Anne Goodwin:

Here is the pre-1900 male descent for John:

1. Absalom Hooper of Natchez and Nashville (born before 1743 and died 
between 4 Dec 1811 and 25 August 1813 in Davidson County, TN)

2. Enos Hooper (between 1766 and 1772, died after 28 Nov 1799 and before 
January 1801, married Anne Young in Davidson Co., TN on 10 March 1796)  
Enos Hooper's given name sometimes appears as Aeneas or Ennis or Ennos.

3. Claiborne Young Hooper (21 April 1799 - 26 June 1848 Davidson Co., TN)

4. Andrew J. Hooper (28 Dec 1835 - 6 Mar 1895)

5. Andrew John Hooper (b. 29 March 1878)*

So that others can understand my terminology is discussing, I have 
previously published a webpage entitled "Hooper Lineage Descriptions" at 
the site:
http://www.fscompass.com/HooperLineages.html

 From the technology of the y-DNA results and from standard genealogical 
research, we now know that, somewhere in history, these groups share a 
common ancestor somewhere in history:
Natchez Absalom
Revolutionary Soldier Absalom
James Hooper, Indian fighter
Pistol Creek Hoopers
Middle Tennessee Hoopers

In this larger grouping of y-DNA matches, James Hooper (the Indian 
fighter) and Natchez Absalom appear to be the earliest individuals. But 
study of all of these groups is likely to afford a better understanding 
of the ancestry of each of the early forefathers.

For example, James Hooper, the Indian fighter, had a son named Bailey 
Hooper. According to the 1850 Humphreys County, Tennessee census, Bailey 
was born 1769 in Virginia. Next door to Bailey in 1850 lived John 
Hooper, apparently Bailey's younger brother. But John, born 1779, was 
born in South Carolina. We already knew, from James "the Indian 
fighter's" testimony, that James Hooper and his family were living in 
upper South Carolina near the North Carolina border, before the outbreak 
of the American Revolution. The Indian fighter's family probably 
followed the typical migration routes - perhaps following the Great 
Wagon Road - from Virginia to South Carolina. Since James Hooper is now 
established as a blood kinsman of the oldest Absalom Hooper, we probably 
should begin to look more intensely in Virginia for Natchez Absalom's 
parents and grandparents.

I'll post more info tomorrow.
Regards,
Anne G





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